Cerwin Vega the Loud Speaker Company. For more than 50 years Cerwin Vega has set the standard for high performance professional and home audio sound with the right products, at the right prices and award-winning innovations. Cerwin Vega pro audio, home audio, floorstanding, bookshelf, center-channel, subwoofer, speakers and amplifiers. Musicians, performing artist, professionals, home theater enthusiast, mobile DJs, and production companies, we invite you to experience the kind of sound that's been disturbing the peace for a half century.

CERWIN VEGA SERVICE AND SUPPORT FAQS
The FAQs are divided into product or service categories. Select a category to go to its Q&A:
  Customer Service Questions
  Home Audio Questions
  Mobile Audio Questions

Customer Service Questions:
1. How can I get replacement Grille Covers for my Cerwin-Vega speakers?
2. Is there a CV Authorized Service Center in my area?
3. If there is no CV Authorized Servicer in my area, how can I have my CV product serviced under the factory warranty?

Home Audio Questions:
1. What amplifier do I need to power my Cerwin-Vega speakers?
2. My receiver is 8 ohms but your speakers are rated at 4 ohms. Is there a problem?
3. The fuse in my tower speakers keeps blowing. What can I do?

Mobile Audio Questions:
1. What amplifier do I need to power my Cerwin-Vega speakers?
2. How do I figure out the volume of my enclosure?
3. If I have two dimensions for my enclosure how can I figure out the third dimension for a given box volume?
4. Is it possible to shorten the tube length while maintaining the tuning frequency of the box?
5. Sometimes the required port tube is too long to fit in the enclosure. Are there any other options to maintain the port area and tube length in my enclosure?
6. Will the Stroker woofers work in a free-air or a periodic setup?

Customer Service Questions
Question #1: How can I get replacement Grille Covers for my Cerwin-Vega speakers?
  Answer: CV offers replacement grilles for most current models. For prices and ordering instructions, go to our Grille Page.
  Back to Customer Service Questions
  Back to top z
Question #2: Is there a CV Authorized Service Center in my area?
Answer: Chances are there is an authorized service location within a reasonable distance from you. To look up locations go to our service center section .
  Back to Customer Service Questions
Question #3: If there is no CV Authorized Servicer in my area, how can I have my CV product serviced under the factory warranty?
Answer: CV customers are welcome to send service items to the factory service department. For instructions go to our service procedures page.
  Back to Customer Service Questions

Home Audio Questions
Question #1: What amplifier do I need to power my Cerwin-Vega speakers?
Answer: Cerwin-Vega recommends using a quality brand name amplifier/receiver. The RMS power rating of the amplifier should be as close as possible to, but not exceed, the power rating of the speaker. By using as powerful an amp as safely possible, the risk of driving the amplifier into clipping is reduced, thereby ensuring that the speakers will receive clean undistorted power. Simply stated: clean power - GOOD, distorted power - BAD.
Question #2: My receiver is 8 ohms but your speakers are rated at 4 ohms. Is there a problem?
Answer: The 4-ohm impedance rating on some of our speakers refers to nominal impedance meaning literally “in name only”. Since a speaker’s actual AC impedance varies depending on the frequency of the input signal, its nominal impedance refers to the impedance or resistance at only one point along the frequency curve. Cerwin-Vega’s nominal impedance rating refers only to the lowest point of the impedance curve which immediately follows its resonant peak. In order to establish this rating, Cerwin-Vega does a sine wave sweep encompassing the entire frequency band and rates the impedance as described above.

When tested, an amplifier is usually driven with a 1 kHz sine wave into an 8-ohm load for 6 to 8 hours without overheating or exceeding its rated distortion levels. This is a very strenuous test and in the real world of normal listening, is the equivalent to playing music at full volume for 6 to 8 hours.

A recent magazine article stated, “. . . if your receiver handled 8 ohms during the UL test, it should handle lower impedance loads under less strenuous conditions at home.” The article went on to say, “. . . a name brand, component grade [stereo amplifier/receiver] will comfortably handle a pair of 4 ohm speakers.”
(Stereo Review, June 1996, p. 64)
Question #3: The fuse in my tower speakers keeps blowing. What can I do?
Answer: If your fuse keeps blowing you can try two quick and easy remedies:

(1) back off on the volume control, or
(2) get a more powerful amplifier.

Dynamic material on modern CDs may tend to blow fuses more readily than other sources such as tapes, records, and radio. This is because the wide bandwidth on a digital recording may stress an amplifier to its limit, pushing it into clipping and distortion. Use a high-quality amplifier with as much power as possible without exceeding the power rating of your speaker. Furthermore, take it easy with the volume control on the amp.

Mobile Audio Questions
Question #1: What amplifier do I need to power my Cerwin-Vega speakers?
Answer: Cerwin-Vega recommends using a quality brand name amplifier/receiver. The RMS power rating of the amplifier should be as close as possible to, but not exceed, the power rating of the speaker. By using as powerful an amp as safely possible, the risk of driving the amplifier into clipping is reduced, thereby ensuring that the speakers will receive clean undistorted power. Simply stated: clean power - GOOD, distorted power - BAD.
Question #2: How do I figure out the volume of my enclosure?
Answer: To calculate the volume of an enclosure, multiply the dimensions in inches (height x width x depth) then divide this total by 1728. This will give you the total volume in cubic feet. Keep in mind that the volume does not need to be exact but should remain within a tolerance of 5%.
Question #3: If I have two dimensions for my enclosure how can I figure out the third dimension for a given box volume?
Answer: Find out the total volume in cubic inches that your enclosure needs to be. Then multiply the two known dimensions (inches). The required box volume (in3) is then divided by the product of the two known dimensions. Example: The recommended box volume for a given subwoofer is 2.0 cu ft. You know that the maximum height that your trunk will allow is 16”, the maximum width is 24”.

  1) Convert the 2.0 cu ft to cubic inches: 2.0 x 1728 = 3456 cu in.
  2) Multiply 16 (max. width) x 24 (max. height) = 384
  3) 3456/384 = 9.00”. This would be the depth of your enclosure.
Question #4: Is it possible to shorten the tube length while maintaining the tuning frequency of the box?
Answer: Yes. The port tube length can be shortened by reducing the total port area. When the port area is reduced, the port tube length must be decreased as well in order to maintain the same tuning frequency of the box. But keep in mind that reducing the area of the port will increase port turbulence and may cause the port to become noisy at higher power levels. If this is your only option, we recommend rounding the inner edges of the port (at both ends of the port tube) or using a port with flared ends to reduce air turbulence at the port openings.
Question #5: Sometimes the required port tube is too long to fit in the enclosure. Are there any other options to maintain the port area and tube length in my enclosure?
Answer: Yes. The port tube need not be straight. If necessary use a 90 degree elbow joint (available from plumbing supply stores) in order to fit the tube inside the enclosure. When bending a port tube be sure to measure through the centerline of the port in order to determine the effective port length. Remember, the open ends of the port tube must have room to "breathe". The port openings must be placed at a proper distance from any surface; inside the box or out. The proper distance should be equal to or greater than the radius of the port opening.

Another option is to position the port tube, completely or partially outside the enclosure.
Question #6: Will the Stroker woofers work in a free-air or a periodic setup?
Answer: We have had some good results with our Stroker 15’s in aperiodic applications, however, for whatever reason they seem to only work well with panel/enclosure types, not the wave mod. Additionally this speaker is specifically designed for ported cabinet applications. You will never get the full potential of a Stroker in another type of application. Other types are quite simply much less efficient. Additionally, the Stroker is a unique product in itself. Resonance is fairly high so we don't feel it is the right choice for any type of aperiodic application.